Thursday, December 20, 2007

Should've Seen This Coming...

Facebook is becoming a little too important to some people - even I've been guilty of exploring other people's lives for a little longer than necessary. However, it looks like the site's users are striking back. Students have developed some applications that will allow students to declare their enemies along with their friends. I find it amusing, although I am not anyone's enemy [yet].

4 comments:

P. Knox said...

How do you know when you have become someone's enemy?

Pete Abbate said...

I meant I am not anyone's enemy on Facebook - I assume the application posts enemies similar to the way "TopFriends" posts friends.

Josh Knox said...

Oh, but do you get a message when you get put on somebody's enemy list? Is that part of the enemy code of conduct? If a little message pops up and says, "John wants to be your enemy, would you like to be enemies?" and if you decline the invitation you can't be enemies, then it wouldn't be very much like real enemies. I thought the application would be more like a list of enemies, and as an enemy you would be blocked from reading it. The only way you could find out is if one of their friends told a friend that happened to also be your friend, and then friend told you…at which point you could start making a list of your own.

Google said...

Applications like this are what's wrong with Facebook. When the developer platform was first announced, it was expected that apps that leverage integration between themselves and Facebook would become the status quo (ie. the excellent Flixster app or the myriad of apps that interface with Flickr's API).

Instead, I've been bombarded with invites to become a vampire, werewolf, ninja, or pirate. Sigh.

PS. Allow non-Google and OpenID comments.

Compared with the totality of knowledge which is continually utilized in the evolution of a dynamic civilization, the difference between the knowledge that the wisest and that which the most ignorant individual can deliberately employ is comparatively insignificant. ~Fredrich Hayek in The Constitution of Liberty